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economy on track and resolve serious situations like syria. >>> good morning from washington. it's friday, november 9th, 2012. this is "the daily rundown" i'm chuck todd. let's get right to my first reads in the morning. at 11:00, in the white house east room the president will speak to the nation for the first time since his election about what he hopes to accomplish before the end of the year. before taking on the new challenges though the president changed his campaign workers this emotional video from wednesday was released by the obama campaign. >> you guys have done, and the work that i'm doing has improved. i'm really proud of that. i'm really proud of all of you. and -- and what -- [ applause ] >> now it's back to governing. today the president will layout his marker for negotiations on the fiscal cliff. the combination of tax hikes and spending cuts that will kick in at the end of the year if nothing is done. a midnight december 30th, the bush tax rates will expire, the alternative minimum tax kicks in. more than half of married couples with two children will owe an additional $4
as we dig deeper, that fact into this plot tonight. joining us right now is "washington post" reporter sauer ri horowitz, and david woods senior military correspondent for "the huffington post." give me a sense, i don't want people to get lost before we start, let me take may own shot at this, how the whole thing is put together. let's watch. the messy and complex web begins with david petraeus. in 2006 petraeus meets paula broadwell, a west point graduate and doctoral student after giving a speech at harvard. fast forward to may of this year. another woman, jill kelley, a friend of petraeus and his wife, begins receiving harassing e-mails. she asks a friend at the fbi to help launch an investigation. the e-mails it is eventually discovered are being sent by broadwell. the fbi also discovers that broadwell and petraeus have been having an affair. meanwhile, the fbi agent who kelley approached gross frustrated after he's kept off the case. his supervisors reportedly are concerned that he has, quote, grown obsessed with the matter. it's also uncovered that he has sent shirtless photos of
, a columnist for "the washington times," pimps, wohors have a brat for welfare america. that was also a defeat for hate last night. >> it was a defeat with hate. listen to the coalition this president has assembled through this election process. have you 93% of the african-american vote. 71% of the latino vote. 70% of the asian-american vote. a majority of young, single women. i mean, it is an extraordinary coalition. look at the movement we made along the lines of progressive politics. you know, we have movement with the legalization of marijuana in a couple of states. that's less about people getting high and more about us addressing the injustices in our criminal justice system with arrest too many substance abusers. look how many women are in the senate. look at the way marriage equality is put on ballots and vote the through. the question really is, can we continue to be behind this, can we continue to push this president and work with him in order to have the kind of government that's effective? forget liberal versus conservative, just any government. >> john boehner, leader of the repub
government shouldn't be involved with, for example, we don't think politicians in washington should be controlling health care choices. women are perfectly capable of making themselves. now, colorado, for eight years we had a president who shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. and his economic plan asked the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in the skills and ideas of our people. and at the time, you may be surprised to learn that the republican congress and a senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plan would kill jobs. kill the economy. turns out their math back then was just as bad as it is now. because by the end of president clinton's second term, america created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up. poverty was down. our deficit had become a surplus. so colorado, we know our ideas work because they've been tested. they've been tried. and we also know that the other folks' ideas don't work because they've been tested. after bill clinton left office, for most of the last decade, we tried giv
to your campaign, that's not change. that's old. that's the washington that needs to change. now, virginia, after four years as president, you know me. you know me. so, so, when you're trying to sort through this argument about change, you know, part of what you have to ask yourself is who do you trust? you know, when you're talking about the economy and policy that's so critical, you've got to trust. michelle doesn't agree with every decision i've made. there may be times when you're frustrated at the pace of change. i am frustrated sometimes with the pace of change. but you know i mean what i say. and i say what i mean. you know what i believe. you know where i stand. when i said we'd end the war in iraq, we ended it. when i said we'd pass health departmentcare reform, we passed it. when i said we'd repeal don't ask, don't tell, we repealed it. you know i tell the truth. and, most importantly, you know i will fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. so let me tell you. i know what real change looks like. i've faugt for it. i've got the scars to prove it. an
evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong there? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bother
politicians in washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves. so, wisconsin, we know what change is. we know what the future requires. we don't need a big government agenda or a small government agenda. we need a middle class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility. we don't need a partisan agenda. we need a common sense agenda that says, when we educate a poor child, we'll a. be better off we need a vision that says we don't just look out for yourself. we look out for one another. we look out for future generations. and we meet those obligations by working together. that's the change we believe in. that's what this election's all. now, let's be clear. achieving this agenda won't be easy. it's never been easy. we always knew that. back in 2008, when we talked about change i told you, i wasn't just talking about changing presidents. i wasn't just talking about changing parties. i was talking about changing our politics. i ran because the voices of the american people, your voice, had been shut out of our democracy for way too long. by lobby
on the budget? live from the russell rotunda in washington, d.c., the independent bernie sanders of vermont. is this newly reelected president the same commander in chief that you saw in the past four years? we're hearing people like that comment. more testosterone. >> thomas, time will tell. but it is clear to me that the president must keep the promise that he made too to the american people. and that is not to do deficit deductions on the backs of the elderly and disabled veterans programs, and we are going to ask the wealthiest people in the country to start paying their fair share of taxes. that's what he told the american people. he won on that. many of us said the same thing. democrats won 25 out of 3 # senate races, and he has got to stick to that position. we will be right behind him on that. >> sir, you've been vocal and an advocate for the progressive agenda. what do you think the president can get done as a liberal? we talked about reducing the deficit, avoiding the fiscal cliff. where will the middle be met? >> on this issue, i think the american people spoke during the electio
are over, will washington do anything or will the town always on break continue to object structure, politicize and, of course, our favorite phrase kick that can down the road? the new washington is basically the same z the one before the election. the president is still obama, the senate is still solidly democratic and the house is republican, albeit by a small erma jort. three people in charge had this to say after the election. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but americans. >> it's better to dance than to fight. it's better to work together. everything doesn't have to be a fight. >> i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together. >> because the american people expect us to find common ground, we're willing to accept additional revenues via tax reform. >> legislation is the art of compromising and consensus building. >> despite all the frustrations of washington, i've never been more h
"hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if t
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
of power." it's no longer forthcoming, it is here. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. good morning, andrea. >> hi there. >> john heilemann, it's been such a long, long road since you guys started reporting on president barack obama -- then-senator barack obama's first election campaign in 2007. here we are five years later, a very emotional moment for the president who has endured five years of the highest highs and the lowest lows in politics. this has to be one of the most special moments for the man. >> undoubtedly. you know, it will be -- you think about the significance of him winning the first time, obviously, an historic moment. but in a lot of ways, you know, if he had lost on tuesday night, there would have been a lot of people who kind of consigned that victory to an accident. >> he would have been an aberration of history. >> almost re-election means as much and maybe in some ways more than the first time, you know. he's not a guy given to public emotion, displays of emotion. back in 2008
obama buries romney. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. the hurricane and this president. hemingway called it grace under pressure, the highly educated call it good government. the american people who count the most call president obama's handling of tropical storm sandy positive. 4 out of 5 give him good marks as first responder in the crisis. the question before the election is whether this huge story about disaster and executive response is the last big one before we vote. is it the october surprise? the black swan that swoops out of nowhere and changes everything? as scarlet o'hara said, there's always tomorrow. chuck todd is nbc's political director and john heilemann is "new york magazine's" national affairs editor and an msnbc analyst. i guess that's my question to start, but let me give you this first. the president this afternoon bagged a big endorsement, new york mayor mike bloomberg, who is always interesting to watch. he cited the president's stance on climate change as the major reason. he writes, quote, one b
the way they are. we've seen over the last four years the status quo in washington they are powerful and they have fought us every step of the way. we've tried and succeeded in reforming our health care system. they spent millions trying to stop us. when we tried and succeeded in reforming wall street, they spent millions to push us back. we kept on going but those were tough fights. what they are counting on now is that you'll get worn down by all the squabble. you'll get fed up with the dysfunction. you'll give up on the change we fought for. you'll walk away and leave them to make decisions that affect every american. in other words, their bet is on cynicism but iowa you taught me to bet on you. you taught me to bet on hope. i'll work with anybody of any party to move this country forward. if you want to break the gridlock in congress you'll vote for leaders who feel the same way whether they're democrats or republicans or independents. the kind of iowa leaders you've always had. there's some principles you got to fight for. there are times where you got to take a stand. the price
are you talking about? >> all of you are in here. in washington, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> richard's in here? >> i don't know why. i'm serious. what's going on? also, look at this cast we have today, the author of "thomas jefferson, the art of power," historian jon meacham. is meacham here? meacham, look at him. >> lots of books. >> and willie, congratulations on your newest honor. >> thank you. are you in nashville, jon meacham? >> i'm in washington. going to be in nashville tomorrow. >> he needs a pipe in that setting. >> yes, he should, and a fireplace. >> you're saying donny's milking this thing. >> we talked about it for ten minutes. we got on the set and donny's, like, can we do this again today? >> unfortunately, joe and i are on what's called the decaying page. guys falling apart. we're on the presidential page. >> you look good. >> right next to brad pitt. >> that kind of ruins it. okay. well, there you go. >> okay, take that down, please. >> oh! >> there we go. >> it's too early for this. >> it is. take that down. i'm sick. so
was in an obama campaign headquarters on the outskirts of the washington metropolitan area in virginia and i was impressed by the methodical nature of what they did and also the distributed nature of what they did. in other words, everybody didn't come to headquarters. the materials, the lists, the walking lists and so forth were all in homes around the region. in other words, people in their individual homes and neighborhoods became the effective campaign headquarters for those areas. they have built on what they did in 2008. they do have a superb ground game. it's going to depend on them getting their own people out in all of these states. they have it divided in terms of types of voters. they have it divided by location. the analogy i use goes to the way the israelis operate in the desert. they don't have a lot of water, but they drop a droplet of water on every seed. the romney campaign theory is the older fashioned wave tv advertising, psychology, tie goes to the challenger situation. but it's such a closely divided country where everybody is microtargeting. maybe that old wave theory j
would be most likely to blame washington and president obama. they're most likely to vote democratic. people who do not have jobs who are struggling and not earning sufficient income seem much more likely to gravitate toward a party with a safety net. people who have jobs and are doing well are more likely to be skeptical of government activity. >> thank you very much. it's the final 100 hours of the campaign. right now president obama and governor romney are both in ohio about to hold campaign events. up next we check in with the political panel. their thoughts on what we see playing you out. running into controversy, new york's decision to move ahead with this week's marathon has sparked a lot of backlash. >> the city of new york is talking about getting water out of the battery tunnel and prepares for a marathon. we're pulling bodies out of the water. >> we feel so strongly that this is the right thing to do for the city of new york, and that this can only be and must only be the starting place of our support. >> so what does your gut tell you? do you support the decision that the
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
to tell me we can't do better than this? washington ought to fix this no matter who wins. maybe they're hoping the democrats just will go home. they don't want to wait in line anymore. joining me tonight, mitch sezer. he's also on the executive board of the democratic committee as a representative of the 14 southern states. i mean, it's great to have you with us tonight. but it just infuriates me when i see video tape like that. i mean, we vote like a third world country. >> well, welcome to ground zero. homeland of rick scott. i will expand the bid and tell you that folks who got online before 7:00, those people had a process by either midnight or 1:00 a.m. this morning. these are people who want their dmok, want the right to vote, and what's standing in their way, as you said, is governor rick scott. >> why is he doing this? why isn't he saying we're going to exhaust every effort we can to make sure there's democracy. i know the answer to it. i want to hear yours. >> it's obvious democrats do well in early voting. statistics prove it. also minorities, especially in south florida te
. i think you guys have a poll out. the nbc washington "wall street journal" poll shows him up by six. you saw romney scrambling to try to change the narrative around the auto bailout. you have the car companies with saying he hasn't been truthful. the fact is four years ago, the unemployment rate was 12%. it's around 7% now. so they are looking at an economy that has improved over the last four years. it's hard for romney's campaign to gain traction there in talking about the economy being so horrible because the reality there is that it has improved. >> john, every credible poll shows romney behind in ohio. do you see it plausible he takes that state? >> the plausible scenario for mitt romney in ohio and other battleground states that are very close like florida or virginia, colorado, that sort of thing, the intensity, the enthusiasm for romney, the zeal of his electle electoral rat, te is built around enthusiasm and what the likely voters screens produce. what we're seeing nationally in our poll today is a 48%/47% race. there's a bit of a mystery to that. it's part art and part sci
in 34 states and washington, d.c. >>> and back to the frenetic pace on the campaign trail. both candidates have already held rallies in new hampshire, iowa, and wisconsin. >> you do want to be able to trust your president. you want to know -- you want to know that -- that your president means what he says and says what he means. after four years of president, you know me. you may not agree with every decision i have made. you may at times have been frustrated by the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. >> made a lot of promises, but those promises he couldn't keep. and the difference between us, he made promises he couldn't keep. i'm making promises i have kept and i will keep them for the american people. i have a clear and unequivocal message, and that is america is about to come roaring back. [ cheering ] >> joining me now, "washington post" columnist and msnbc analyst eugene robinson, marc caputo and mark murray. thank you so much, gentlemen, for joining. i got to bring eugene in because he is right here and i have the pleasure of sitting alon
of trying to get things accomplished in washington. >> bill mcinturf and peter hart. the best in the business, the best poll and we're so happy and proud to have you and have you as colleagues, thank you very much. >>> mitt romney is touching all bases today, from iowa to ohio, where the campaign is going head to head with the obama team's ground troops, county by county. shawn spicer, shawn, good to see you. i want to ask you about the travel plans. the fact that the romney/ryan team going to pennsylvania has raised a lot of eyebrows, the democrats say it's desperation, because they know they can't win ohio, have to find some other route to 270. republicans in pennsylvania and elsewhere say it's a real campaign. and that there's a real possibility there. tell us what you're seeing on the ground. >> i think we're going to carry ohio. i think we got real shot at pennsylvania. so if you use their metric, the governor and paul ryan have been in ohio extensively over the last couple of days, they'll continue to be there in the last 48 hours that proves that we believe we think we'
the republican mayor ordered them closed. joining me now from washington is karen finney a former dnc director, msnbc political analyst. and here with me is the great eugene robinson. welcome to both of you. gene, these long lines in florida are there because rick scott decided to cut the early voting days almost in half. 2.5 million people have voted early. yet we're expected to believe this has got nothing to do with politics. what is this man doing? >> well, there are two american traditions here at work. one is vote k problems in florida. this is something we like to do. and the second is republicans trying to restrict the franchise. if you can narrow the electorate and keep those democratic people, the system and throughout this election cycle we're seeing more of it. >> eugene, you use a voice that sounds accepting. this is appalling. >> i don't mean to. it is appalling. we've seen it before. >> people died in 1965 for the right to vote and now they're being prevented from doing so. >> exactly. exactly. >> karen, in ohio the big story is the states provisional ballot. the republican in c
of light rain in washington state. election day, we're looking good. now let's talk about the nor'easter and the effects for everyone devastated by sandy. first off, the coldest morning yet this fall season and the coldest morning since the hurricane, windchills are in the 20s right now. as far as the storm evolution, let's put it in motion and watch it coming up the north. watch the clock moving to the right. as it heads to the north, the rain shields off the coast. possibility of snow from philadelphia to trenton, up to the jersey shore, rain down around southern new england. what this all means is a little further off the coast, the winds would be a little bit weaker right along the shore. but we do have the possibility of seeing snow now in the areas hit by sandy. i think we'd take that, couple inches of wet, sloppy snow, no further irs for the power outages. again, good news as far as the nor'easter's concerned. you're watching "morning joe." more continuing coverage from democracy plaza, we're brewed by starbucks. no, no, no, stop! humans -- one day, we're coming up with the
the time. the spirit of it is go out to the polls. the "washington post" has a pretty strong assessment of why this is so in some ways despicable on the national stage. the romney campaign thinks so little of the american voter at this point. that we don't need the specifics, that you can get away with these small attacks to obfuscate the larger message which is we don't know what romney is about, he hasn't taken questions from reporters and this is your closing argument? >> they've not only taken out an ad but they have repeated this almost half a dozen times today on the stump. what do you make of it? is this really a focal point now for the romney campaign and their closing argument of the american people? >> i don't think it's so much a focal point but a reemphasis, just sort of making the point as you saw in the rest of the clip there, the contrast, the president wants to talk about your vote being a matter of revenge and i want to talk to you about your vote being about america. so i think they were setting that up. i get the joke. if romney had used that word in the context of so
editor of the grio and ryan grim, washington bureau chief for "the huffington post." joy, i want to go to you first in terms of the akin and mourdock races, these guys can't help but stepping in it and now it seems like the chickens are coming home to roost. >> thanks to crazy, democrats are going to hold on to the seat. thank you, crazy. i think it's good that these guys ran in the sense that it has ripped the veil off of something that particularly younger women, a lot of democrats either didn't know or didn't want to think about, which is that you have a hard core religious element within the republican party that does believe that women should not be making basic choices about their health care and that women have ruined the workforce for being in it. >> and women being dragged around by their hair and so forth? >> indeed. i'm predicting that mccaskill will do better than that margin. a lot of people say they are going to vote for republican but i have a pretty good feeling she is going to do well. >> ryan, it's amazing how it's turned the departure of senior leadership, the republ
different and better coalitions in washington, finding his own versions of moderate republicans to come with him. if he wines a second term, the question is, did he learn lessons from that? did # are there better ways of going about building these coalitions? and maybe are there better ways of building coalitions outside of washington, trying to go to certain places and certain states and trying to overperform in certain states. >> if the president does squeak out a victory tuesday night, and people believe we will, because of things he did, killing bin laden, helping out hispanic kids brought to this country at an early age, these are things he did, the thing he did with governor christie the other day, these are actual doing things. does he learn that lesson? >> i think the lesson is, if he wins one of the top two or three factors will be the auto rescue. that is key to ohio. if he keeps ohio, it's because of the automobiles and the fact that you can see automobiles on the street. you can see chrysler and dodge and gm cars. that's tangible and that is 1 out of 8 workers in ohio. proba
with washington and what could make it work better. we're back in democracy plaza and some of the stranger ways to predict who will win on tuesday. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ >>> a now a different way to predict the winner of the presidential race. you may heard of the red skins rule. when they win their last home game prior to a presidential election, that election is won by the party that won the popular vote in the previous election. when they lose the last home game, it is won by the party that lost the popular vote in the previous election. this rule is 18 for 18. it had an addendum to it because the one year it could have been wrong when they lost but president bush won re-election. but the popular vote. in 2008, the phillys won the world series, obama carried pennsylvania and he went on to win the election. in '96 the yankees won, clinton carried new york. tigers won, reagan carried mitch, you get the picture? we could keep going. you get to go all the way back to herbert hoover. the world series champs this year come from california. and one of the newest predictors is in college foot
're going to tell me that we can't do better than this? washington better fix this no matter who wins. maybe they are hoping the democrats will go home and they don't want to wait in line anymore. joining me now is chairman of the broward county democratic party on the executive board of the national committee as a representative of the 14 southern states. i mean, it's great to have you with us but it just infuriates me when i see videotape like that. we vote like a third world country. >> well, welcome to ground zero, which is south florida, homeland of rick scott. lee expand a bit and tell you that yesterday in broward, dade, and palm beach, folks that got online right before 7:00, those people are following a process by either midnight or 1:00 a.m. this morning, these are people who want their democracy, want the right to vote and are standing in their way. >> why isn't he saying, we're going to exhaust every effort that we can to ensure that there's democracy? i know the answer to that. i want to hear yours. >> it's obvious that democrats do well in early voting, also minorities tend to
been a storm in washington for the past four years. people couldn't see it, just by turning on the tv, but they hear about it. we have a continuing financial crisis in this country, and the republican obstructionists, well, they refuse to help. president obama came into office with a crisis on the scale of this current natural disaster. it required a heavy lift. from all players to get america back on track. republicans, where were they? well, they were not willing participants. journalist michael grunwald wrote, "vice president joe biden was warned not to expect any bipartisan cooperation on major votes. biden said, i spoke to seven different republican senators who said, joe, i'm not going to be able to help you on anything." his informants said senate minority leader mitch mcconnell had demanded unified resistance. the way it was characterized to me was for the next two years we can't let you succeed in anything. that's our ticket to coming back. what if we took that attitude right there to the storm damage and cleanup? now mitt romney said he's the guy who can reach across the ais
of ohio. >> dr. peterson, "the washington post," to ari's point, had an article entitled, mitt romney's campaign insults voters. through all the flip-flops there has been one consistency in the campaign of republican president nominee mitt romney, a contempt for the electorate. mr. romney seems to be betting that voters have no memories, poor arithmetic skills and general inability to look behind the curtain. we hope the results tuesday prove him wrong. >> yeah, again, if we put that revenge comment in its proper context, part of what that revenge is about is romney's violation of the public trust. when we look at these different things that have gone on in the campaign, it's very, very difficult to see mitt romney as an authentic campaigner or authentic politician. that's where you get the revenge piece. that's where the oped seems to be right on point. again, we look at a number of different issues. look at the adz playing in ohio right now. you look at that chrysler ad, you look at this desperate republican ad trying to convince black folk that the republican party are on their sid
of them talk about what's wrong with washington and what could make it work better. we're back in democracy plaza and some of the stranger ways to predict who will win on tuesday. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. i'm thinking about upgrading... finally! jonathan was fine when you were in your 20s, but he's not right for you. good-bye jonathan and his creepy little girl hands. i meant... [ male announcer ] or choosing a windows 8 device with help from the experts at staples. another way staples and hp make it easier to upgrade. make your windows 8 experience even better with hp. and this week, get $200 off the hp envy dv6 notebook. staples. that was easy. >>> a now a different way to predict the winner of th
washington to dine at the white house was taken as an outrage in many corridors. america today is a world away from the cruel and prideful bigotry of that time. there is no better evidence of this than the election of an african-american to the presidency of the united states. >> senator mccain was right. that at no other time in american history could this moment have been possible. and even as the opponent, he was a bit swept up in that moment. remember the front page of the new york times after the election, obama, racial barrier falls in decisive victory. the victory was decisive, but the barrier had not fallen. then senator obama was simply hoisted over it, propelled by decades of civil rights demonstrations. hard won legislative victories, educational opportunities and shifting racial boundaries. but senator mccain, "the new york times" and frankly many pundits writing in the heady moments of the victory failed to articulate how firmly the barriers remained intabt. the win was a culmination, not the single definitive, most sought after culmination, but a culmination of racial strugg
of washington, d.c. he there introduced president obama to a crowd of supporters. before the president made his case to virginia voters. today, the presidents started a four-state double team strategy. in new hampshire in front of 14,000 supporters, president clinton was moving on to north carolina. because president clinton can't be in two places at once, he let his words speak for him in iowa. he wrote -- >> joinianna marie cox, the toi striking how much this relationship has warmed up in the last four years. >> it is. at first, you could tell clinton was being a good soldier. he was going out and doing what he needed to do, wasn't having maybe the best time. over the past year, i think we've seen clinton starting to have the good time he always has, and that turning into, yeah, a bromance between the two of them. like that last rally, think did the high five. they're getting there. >> let's talk about the fact that they are getting along better is a good thing, but clinton and his appeal to a class of voter that the president has not been able to crack, which is white working class voters. >
for the president. that said, you think about 18 -- 1980 where every elite in washington and manhattan was sure jimmy carter was going to win. i don't care what they say now. look at frank reynolds saying what the hell is going on on the election night? nobody saw the reagan revolution coming. nobody saw it coming. let me say it again, revisionist, nobody saw it coming. and then i remember walking on set in 2004, and everybody -- not only at this network, at nbc, abc, cbs, in boston, in austin, all talking about president kerry. that was two hours before the polls closed. >> bob shrum. >> everybody knew that john kerry had won the race. everybody. let me repeat. everybody. two hours before. and then we all remembered what happened in new hampshire when everybody was dancing on hillary clinton's grave. >> oh, my god. >> the day of the new hampshire primary. >> let's look at primary crowds. >> mika and i, we're at a nashua gym and saw hillary up there speaking. >> they were, like, bringing people in from out of state. >> everybody came in from massachusetts. and i said, you know, she deserves a b
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